Workers’ Compensation Facts

Ten Important Facts You Should Know About Workers Compensation Rights

  1. Always report a work injury even if you might not lose time from work or need immediate medical care. It is critical that you require your employer to complete an accident report ( Employer’s Report of Occupational Injury).

  2. Remember to keep an independent record of the date, time, and nature of your work injury. In addition, make a list of witnesses as well as the person to whom the injury is reported

  3. Be sure to provide a complete and accurate account of the type of injury you sustained and how your injury occurred as well as your past medical history.

  4. If your employer fails to accept your claim after you notify them, seek legal assistance and file a petition for compensation.

  5. Should your employer accept your injury, be certain that the wages upon which your compensation is based are accurate. In most cases your compensation should be 70% of your gross weekly wage.

  6. If, after receiving compensation, your employer asks you to see another physician, seek legal advice immediately as this is your employer’s first step in their attempt to either terminate your compensation or modify your benefits.

  7. It is possible that your employer may offer you modified work based on medical proof that you are able to perform that work. This can cause you to lose your benefits by failing to accept the newly defined work. (Seek legal advice at once.)

  8. Once you reach maximum medical improvement (MMI), you are expected to return to work. If you are unable to return to your job due to your injury, you may be terminated. (Seek legal advice.)

  9. Should you receive notice in the mail to terminate or modify your compensation, seek legal advice.

  10. NEVER sign any agreement without having it reviewed by an attorney.

More Information

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